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Second Writing Experiment

Second Writing Experiment
 

Five words chosen for the purposes of the current paper are “royal”, “savage”, “courage”, “wonderful” and “fetter”. The origin of “royal” traces back to the middle 13th century, when it was modeled on the Old French roial, which connoted something or someone related to a king. The word “savage” also has its roots in the middle 13th century, when it was borrowed from Old French sauvage, which in its turn related to Late Latin salvaticus, meaning “that of the woods” (Skeat, 2005). “Courage” is most likely a close kin of Old French corage, which comes from Vulgar Latin coraticum, a derivative of Latin cor. “Wonderful” comes from late Old English wunderfull, cognate to German wunder and Dutch wonder, but has unknown ultimate origin. According to the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (2011), the word “fetter” comes from Old English fetor, meaning “chain or shackle for the foot”. The figurative sense of “anything that trammels or restrains” had evolved in late Old English. Of all word roots scrutinized hereinabove, cor, a Latin equivalent of “heart”, is the most engaging and revealing. It is interesting that “heart” is a common metaphor for bravery and inner strengths. Some examples are “to pluck up heart”, “to lose heart”, “to have the heart”, “to take heart”, “stouthearted”, “lionhearted”, “faint-hearted” etc. Thus, “heart” is a truly universal word to describe a person, whether he/she is courageous or pusillanimous. Projecting these findings onto the previous writing experiment, it would be fair to say that they lend a new understanding to the written piece. Metaphorically speaking, the above word exploration may help the author of current paper get to the heart of literary writing, for it clarified the tre meaning of the words under consideration.

The segment from the previous writing experiment that will be recast in different wording for the purposes of the paper is cited below:

 

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Last weekend, I watched the movie, Three Idiots, which gave me a very deep impression. It told a story of a genius student against with the traditional education and changes his two friends’ life. It happens in the India royal technology school. This is a traditional Indian elite, where the sole criterion for testing only student achievement! Poor performance means no future! Launceston is unwilling to follow the crowd, he used his kind, cheerfulness, humor and wisdom to affect the people around him. He learned to physics lessons savage seniors, he broke with the wisdom of traditional concepts of Education College legalistic. Finally he became genius scientist in India, he realized his dream, also made back real self. Raja wanted to become an engineer, and Afghan would like to become law rare wildlife photographer, under the influence of Launceston, they eventually got what they really want to.

First Version

Last weekend, I felt somewhat emotionally constipated and hungry for new emotions. Under such circumstances, I decided to watch a movie that could cause an outpouring of deep feelings in me. Three Idiots tells a story of a prodigy student and his impact on the life of his close friends. They all study at the Imperial College of Engineering, one of the very few academic pedigrees acceptable for an Indian engineer. The vast majority of students studying there have some pretensions to gentility, but they are marked for their achievements rather than the status of their families. Indolent students unwilling to apply themselves are likely to end up on the dole. Ranchoddas Shyamaldas Chanchad, the protagonist of the movie, remonstrates against following the dictates of the crowd and employs his immaculate sense oof humor, as well as his ebullience and generosity to make new acquaintances. He was skeptical about the value of rote learning prevalent in his school and abhorred the savageness of the seniors. Towards the end of the movie, the protagonist fulfills his dream of becoming a prominent Indian scientist, thereby regaining his self-confidence. What is more important, the example of Ranchoddas emboldened his faithful friends from the Imperial College of Engineering – Raju and Farhan – who are shown to become an engineer and a wildlife photographer at the end of the film.

Second Version

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Either out of boredom or due to the happy confluence of circumstances, I watched a coming-of-age film Three Idiots a week ago. It transpired that the plot of the film was thought-provoking and profoundly shocking, which I liked. Ranchoddas Shyamaldas Chanchad, the main character, is something of an idiot savant with a knack for technical studies and a strong sense of friendship. The school, in which Ranchoddas and his friends study, has an outstanding reputation among the Indian upper class, though not all students stem from affluent families. Strangely enough, in the midst of all the glitter of the Imperial College of Engineering, diligence and perseverance remain the most valuable qualities for the professors. The protagonist of the film is tired of the myopic interests of the lisping sons of privilege around him and relies on his love for life to change the world. The methods of teaching used in the Imperial College of Engineering jar the protagonist’s faith in studying and he attempts to delve deeper into the facts that interest him. As a result, Ranchoddas propels himself to the top by sheer ability and becomes a luminary of business management in India. The fact that Ranchoddas did not forget about his friends and encouraged them to pursue their dreams is a testament to the genuine camaraderie between them.

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